The Star of Malta
Issue 6 Winter 2000
Published by the Autonomous Priory of
The Sovereign Military Order of St. John of Jerusalem
Editor/Publisher
Sir John L. Harris, Jr., MD, KStJ, KM
Sotheby Square Number One
2151 Broadway SW Apt. #1
Roanoke, VA 24014-1754




Splendor in Diversity: The Order of St. John Following the Great Siege
By: Sir Eric Johansson, KStJ

Many of our brethren knights have asked questions of our Illustrious Order. For example, what happened after 1565? Was the Order continued? Where is it going today? These are valid questions and we would like to show that the Order is international in today?s world, that it continues to flower and like the traditions of its founding, it assists the distressed throughout the world.
Prior to the Great Siege, the Order established a special Hospital on Malta, finished in 1532. The new hospital could accommodate 500 patients and these were treated to the best practices of the time. The patients were personally served by the knights. Indeed, it was a firm rule that patients ate first, receiving the best of food, before the knights could even partake of repast themselves. Chroniclers speak of the knights serving ?white bread? on silver plates to their guests in the hospital. Later the Hospital was expanded to include Schools of Anatomy, Surgery, Pharmacy – all of which received renown throughout the Western World.
Baroque churches and official buildings followed the successful end of the Siege. The Conventual Church of St. John the Baptist was finished in 1577; the Palace of the Grand Masters and the various associated Inns soon followed. In 1761 a magnificent Public Library was established in Valetta; in 1768 the University was opened. In 1786 The School of Mathematics and Nautical Sciences was founded. All were considered among the greatest centers of learning. The Nautical Science School showed the continued interest of the knights in the sea from which they had reaped so much glory.
Following the disastrous occupation of Malta in 1798, an element of the knights established itself in Rome in 1834 where a headquarters came under the control of the Vatican. However, the Order itself could not be chiefly confined to Rome. Many other European states protected and nurtured the Order, now internationalist, under the tutelage of their respective sovereigns.
In Germany, the Order had extended itself in the 12th and 13th centuries. The Bailiwick of Brandenburg became a Protestant holding in the 16th century but it maintained close contacts with the Roman Catholic Branch and maintained its title of the Knights of Malta. It was abolished in 1811 by the King of Prussia who replaced it in 1812 with the Royal Prussian Order of St. John, bestowing its distinctive white cross badge for Merit. However, in 1852 the Order was refounded as a Noble Prussian Order. Following 1918 it was separated from the State Government and achieved independence. Currently it operates the most important of the German ambulance services. Commanderies of the Order exist in France, Hungary, Switzerland, and Finland. In Russia the Order was established under Czar Paul I in the last years of the 18th century. It flourished under the successor but was extinguished in 1917 Bolshevik Revolution. Thanks for the foresight of American Commanders Sir Joseph Walters and Sir Glen Stinson, it was re-established in the New Russia in the 1990s where it is supported by church authorities and is expected to grow once again.
The Order of St. John also exists in the Netherlands. As with the German branch, the Order came to this area in the 12th and 13th centuries. After the Reformation, it affiliated itself with the German Bailiwick of Brandenburg and was purged in 1811 following the fall of the German division. However, in the Netherlands it was refounded once again in 1852 and later in 1909 a separate Commandery was formed. Later in 1946 it separated from the German Order and came under the protection of the Crown of the Netherlands, but it is not a State Order.
The Order also appeared in Sweden around the 12th century but was not prolific. In 1530 the Order became Protestant and was associated with the 1850s Bailiwick of Brandenburg. In 1920 the Swedish government accepted the Order as being Swedish with association to the Prussian home Chancellery. In 1946 the Sovereign of Sweden took over the protection of the Order, severing its relationship with the German branch.
In the United Kingdom the Order also flourished under the protection of the Queen Victoria and her successors as the Order of the British Crown. The St. John?s Ambulance Brigade is best known and the most public manifestation of the good works of the Order. It was even granted in 1888, a Royal Charter by Queen Victoria. Indeed, various branches of the British Order are to be found in over 40 countries, most of them English-speaking.
The British Order has no sectarian restrictions on membership.
The Order of the Knights of Malta is even acknowledged under International Law. On Augusts 24, 1944 the Order was granted ?Permanent Observer? status in the United Nations, allowing it to take part in General Assembly business.
Needles to say the Order still exists in Malta: it has both Protestant as well as Catholic priories and there are many different commanderies in the United States and Europe. Some are recognized by the Vatican; some are not but recognition by the Vatican is not necessary for the Good Works of the Order.
It is conservatively estimated that perhaps 12,000 knights exist in the various Commanderies. That is quite a number when you consider that there were only 540 Knights on Malta in 1565 with attendant supporters to ward off the greatest Siege in their history.
It is expected that the Order will continue to flourish: with relief expeditions to the Americas, Africa, Asia, and Russia, not to mention Central Europe. The Good Works of the Order have become a strong international force for the relief of distress throughout the world.


AMONG THE HERD


By: Sir Glen Stinson, KStJ, KM
Priory Commander

This article provides a synopsis only. It mentions recent discussions between some of the Knights of this Priory and Knights of different priories. Internal affairs were discussed.


Following the Great Siege

By: Sir Eric Johansson, KStJ

Many of our brethren knights have asked questions of our Illustrious Order. For example, what happened after 1565? Was the Order continued? Where is it going today? These are valid questions and we would like to show that the Order is international in today?s world, that it continues to flower and like the traditions of its founding, it assists the distressed throughout the world.
Prior to the Great Siege, the Order established a special Hospital on Malta, finished in 1532. The new hospital could accommodate 500 patients and these were treated to the best practices of the time. The patients were personally served by the knights. Indeed, it was a firm rule that patients ate first, receiving the best of food, before the knights could even partake of repast themselves. Chroniclers speak of the knights serving ?white bread? on silver plates to their guests in the hospital. Later the Hospital was expanded to include Schools of Anatomy, Surgery, Pharmacy – all of which received renown throughout the Western World.
Baroque churches and official buildings followed the successful end of the Siege. The Conventual Church of St. John the Baptist was finished in 1577; the Palace of the Grand Masters and the various associated Inns soon followed. In 1761 a magnificent Public Library was established in Valetta; in 1768 the University was opened. In 1786 The School of Mathematics and Nautical Sciences was founded. All were considered among the greatest centers of learning. The Nautical Science School showed the continued interest of the knights in the sea from which they had reaped so much glory.
Following the disastrous occupation of Malta in 1798, an element of the knights established itself in Rome in 1834 where a headquarters came under the control of the Vatican. However, the Order itself could not be chiefly confined to Rome. Many other European states protected and nurtured the Order, now internationalist, under the tutelage of their respective sovereigns.
In Germany, the Order had extended itself in the 12th and 13th centuries. The Bailiwick of Brandenburg became a Protestant holding in the 16th century but it maintained close contacts with the Roman Catholic Branch and maintained its title of the Knights of Malta. It was abolished in 1811 by the King of Prussia who replaced it in 1812 with the Royal Prussian Order of St. John, bestowing its distinctive white cross badge for Merit. However, in 1852 the Order was refounded as a Noble Prussian Order. Following 1918 it was separated from the State Government and achieved independence. Currently it operates the most important of the German ambulance services. Commanderies of the Order exist in France, Hungary, Switzerland, and Finland. In Russia the Order was established under Czar Paul I in the last years of the 18th century. It flourished under the successor but was extinguished in 1917 Bolshevik Revolution. Thanks for the foresight of American Commanders Sir Joseph Walters and Sir Glen Stinson, it was re-established in the New Russia in the 1990s where it is supported by church authorities and is expected to grow once again.
The Order of St. John also exists in the Netherlands. As with the German branch, the Order came to this area in the 12th and 13th centuries. After the Reformation, it affiliated itself with the German Bailiwick of Brandenburg and was purged in 1811 following the fall of the German division. However, in the Netherlands it was refounded once again in 1852 and later in 1909 a separate Commandery was formed. Later in 1946 it separated from the German Order and came under the protection of the Crown of the Netherlands, but it is not a State Order.
The Order also appeared in Sweden around the 12th century but was not prolific. In 1530 the Order became Protestant and was associated with the 1850s Bailiwick of Brandenburg. In 1920 the Swedish government accepted the Order as being Swedish with association to the Prussian home Chancellery. In 1946 the Sovereign of Sweden took over the protection of the Order, severing its relationship with the German branch.
In the United Kingdom the Order also flourished under the protection of the Queen Victoria and her successors as the Order of the British Crown. The St. John?s Ambulance Brigade is best known and the most public manifestation of the good works of the Order. It was even granted in 1888, a Royal Charter by Queen Victoria. Indeed, various branches of the British Order are to be found in over 40 countries, most of them English-speaking.
The British Order has no sectarian restrictions on membership.
The Order of the Knights of Malta is even acknowledged under International Law. On Augusts 24, 1944 the Order was granted "Permanent Observer" status in the United Nations, allowing it to take part in General Assembly business.
Needles to say the Order still exists in Malta: it has both Protestant as well as Catholic priories and there are many different commanderies in the United States and Europe. Some are recognized by the Vatican; some are not but recognition by the Vatican is not necessary for the Good Works of the Order.
It is conservatively estimated that perhaps 12,000 knights exist in the various Commanderies. That is quite a number when you consider that there were only 540 Knights on Malta in 1565 with attendant supporters to ward off the greatest Siege in their history.
It is expected that the Order will continue to flourish: with relief expeditions to the Americas, Africa, Asia, and Russia, not to mention Central Europe. The Good Works of the Order have become a strong international force for the relief of distress throughout the world.



KNIGHTS RECOGNIZED

Sir Mark Stinson, KStJ, KM

At a ceremony held at the Headquarters of the Kansas City (MO) Police Force, Sir Mark Splendor in Diversity: The Order of St. John. Stinson was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal. Sir Mark was recognized for his special efforts in breaking up a robbery ring in the South District of the Metropolitan area of Kansas City.
The award was presented by Chief Easley of the Kansas City Police Department.
Previously, Sir Mark was awarded the Life Saving Medal for saving a man that nearly bled to death from his injuries. Quick reaction and knowledge of first aid, on the part of this knight, saved the man?s life.

Sir Steven and Sir John

Our priory has again two more Knights for their service to the Order.
By action of the Board of Director, Sir Stephen Dona was presented with the Meritorious Service Award. His recognition was the result of his tremendous support of the Priory and deeds at the time of need.
Sir Stephen is currently assisting the Priory by designing and creating a Web Page for the Priory in order that others may become aware of our existence.

The Board has also recognized Sir John D. Noble for his response to the needs of the Priory. His support and his belief in the cause of the Order was demonstrated by his commitment.
The award consisted of a Certificate of Meritorious Service and a Red Service Bar with a white Maltese Cross, which will be worn on the right breast of the coat or jacket opposite the other battle honors and decorations.
PRIORY MEETS IN RENO

Another Round Table meeting of the Priory was held in Reno, Nevada. Such meetings allow for communications and exchanges of ideas between the Knights and the Order.

Thirteen people attended the dinner which has held at the Atlantis Hotel. Among those present were Lady Donna Seip, Sir John Sheppard, Sir Owens Williams, Sir John Noble, Sir Max and Maria Johnson, Sir Everett and Judy Edinburg and Sir Glen Stinson. Guests present were Mrs. Jeanne Belcher, Mr. Peter and Geri Amunrund and Mr. Arthur Colson.

After cocktails and dinner, Sir Glen held a Round Table discussion where questions and suggestions were presented by all the members present.


OBITUARIES

Lady Una Marie Walters

Lady Una Marie Walters, 62, wife of Sir Albert Walters for 46 years, passed away on August 19, 1999. The funeral was attended by many of the Knights of Malta in the Kansas City, Missouri area.
Lady Una was a past president of the Altar Guild of the Lady of Loures of Roman Church. She was a member of the Board of Governors of the Park Land Medical Center. She had also served as Vice President of the Service Printing and Graphics, Inc.
In addition to her husband, Mrs. Walters is survived by two brothers-in-law; Sir Charles Walters, KStJ, KM and Sir Joe Anton Walters, KStJ, KM.



Sir Tony Diamond

Sir Frank Anthony Pacelli, aka? Sir Tony Diamond? passed away on August 1, 1999. Services were held at the Old North Church, Forest Lawn, Hollywood Hills, California.
At the funeral, the Knights of Malta were represented by Gen. Sir Roger Rothrock, Sir John Sheppard, Sir Henry von Seyfried, Gen. Sir Johnny Grant, and Sir Joseph Smith. The Knights were in attendance at both the church as well as the grave side services.
Sir Tony was an avid supporter of the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem, Knights of Malta. He, among other things, was a former Chairman of the Los Angeles Mayor?s Veteran Affairs Advisory Committee.
Sir Tony was a veteran of the Vietnam War and was the founder of BRAVO (Brotherhood Rally of Veterans Organizations).
He is survived by his wife, Barbara; his son, Anthony Pacelli, and daughter-in-law Michelle; his daughter Marissa Pacelli and son; and three step-children, David, Jeff and Laura Hillman.
We will all miss Sir Tony and the help and concern that he demonstrated.


Our Priory offers it most sincere sympathy and condolences to the family of the above deceased. May the light perpetual shine upon them!


Winter Meetings Planned

Sir Glen Stinson was so pleased with the outcome of the general meeting held in Reno, Nevada recently, that he wishes to establish another meeting in the Mid-Atlantic Area this winter, probably in January or February.
He desires that member knights would advise him as to the best date, venue and some idea of an agenda which may be pursued. Our Priory very seriously needs your input. Such meetings will prove most valuable in the planning of our operations for the future.



ADVERTISEMENTS

KNIGHTS RINGS AVAILABLE

The large Knight's Seal Ring worn by members of the Order are again available. A very limited supply of solid g
old rings have been obtained and are for sale. These gold rings weighing about 38 grams of 10 carat gold sell for $650.00 each and have been appraised by jewelers at a price of over $1,000.00 each.
Currently three rings are available and may be obtained by contacting Sir Glen Stinson at P.O. Box 1141 Platte City, Missouri, 64079.


BLAZER PATCHES AVAILABLE

Again the Priory has been able to obtain a supply of our regular beautiful colored blazer patches for the membership. These patches are of very high quality and were made by the same company who manufactured them for us originally.
Blazer patches are appropriate for wearing by both Knights as well as Dames of the Order. They really stand out and identify the wearer that he/she is a part of a very special group and may be worn on jackets, coats, or sweaters.
These patches may be obtained for the price of $15.00 each which includes shipping costs, by ordering them from the Knights of Malta, P.O. Box 1141 Platte City, Missouri, 64079.


Opinions expressed and published in this Newsletter do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Editor/Publisher or the Priory Board.
The Knights of Malta, Ltd. Copyright © 2000
Copyright © KnightsUSA. All Rights Reserved